Fridays 5 with Caleb Ajinomoh

Caleb Ozovehe Ajinomoh was born on 17th November 1990.
He's an enthusiastic Liverpool supporter, big dreamer and print journalist.
His first book "Job Seekers do Stupid Things" was released on the 11th of September, 2015.
His next title "Gentlemen, come and be going" is in the works for a public release early next year.
You'll never find him without five hundred pens, three thousand blank pages and a Liverpool scarf. Oh, suicidal romantic too. xx

Twitter @queerpants

He blogs and stuff at beardlessmadman.wordpress.com

When did you first get serious about writing?

A.) when I knew it was absolutely impossible for me to succeed at pretty much nothing else. The moment I realized I had begun putting my ten thousand hours into this craft a long time ago and there was no point starting afresh on some other career path. Sometime last year (2015)

2.) What is the hardest part for you about writing?

A.)  I have always maintained that getting your message across how you intend it is not quite as easy as advertised. So I tell writers: do your best job of putting your work out there and hope your reader gets it the way you intended.

Click on cover for more info or to order!


Synopsis:
Job seekers do stupid things. All the damn time. It’s almost as if an art form in itself for unemployed people. This book isn’t set out to amplify the job seeker’s everyday gaffe as much as it tries to assure the regular Joe in the job market that it is okay to suck a little, to be clueless about the simplest things to do to hasten your job market success, do a bit of the non—commonsensical while trying to find a job, showing through real life experiences/stories how other people have gone about the business of finding a job successfully and otherwise; find out what kind of job seeker you might be, how best to approach the Nigerian job market and what you should fix to see your job market value hit the ceiling!

3.) How did you feel upon publication of your first completed project?

A.)  Einstein-level feels. Like biblical Lot right before he turned into a pillar of salt. Like a fat kid who ate his cake and somehow still managed to have it.

4.) What is more important to you, story, or character? Why?

A.) story because I find creating my characters around a story is quite easier than casting characters before I have a story. Ultimately though, later in my career, I’ll attempt to put the characters first just to see how it turns out.  

5.) What is a typical day like in your world?

A.)  wake up; get at the bible, some meditation, quick run through of my email and twitter, then get to writing. Writing could of course mean reviewing yesterday’s plot, building on where I stopped from last night or just reading other peoples’ works. Reading for me is still writing because I take mental notes a lot. It is almost mechanical.

Fridays 5 with CearĂșil Swords

I'm alive and well and feel that under the circumstances and when the rest of humankind (both past and present) is taken into account that this state of affairs is both a decent achievement and worthy of recognition.
Other than that, well I was born in Dublin. The one in Ireland, not California. I have never been to the Californian namesake though the public library looks nice in a photo I saw ;) I have lived in several other countries including Canada, Scotland and Spain. I recommend them all.

1.) When did you first get serious about writing?

A.) I finished a diploma in entrepreneurship. Something that stuck with me was the advice that we should be involved in something we knew well. I decided to work on a project to help students with the transition out of school and into the wider world. In order to gain some creditability with schools I wrote a book (in fact I wrote two) and sent it to schools. It was kind of my calling card. It helped me get a few gigs talking to the students. The fiction I write developed out of needing some time to myself during my campaign for local elections in 2014.

2.) What is the hardest part for you about writing?

A.) The ideas come thick and fast. The problem is more about completing them. I have several that I was really excited about at different stages but unless I see them through quickly there is a good chance they won't be finished or will have a much longer waiting period before completion.

Click on cover for more info or to order!

Synopsis:

Tales of everyday magic have been in short supply but this collection of short stories makes heroes of the hitherto ignored men and women on the ground. So forget Goldilock, Sleeping Beauty and Rumplestiltskin and prepare to enter the real(ish), modern and still magical world of Bedtime Stories for Grown Ups.  

3.) How did you feel upon publication of your first completed project?

A.) I was probably like “well that's done, what's next?”
I think other people were more impressed than I was. I was there so I knew all the bits and pieces that went into it and somehow that made me less in awe of it. Maybe something about it being easier to pull off than people understand. Of course I learned that most of the work takes place after you finish writing ;)

4.) What is more important to you, story, or character? Why?

A.) I had hazard to say you can still have a story without a lot of character development. But, it's harder to have characters without something for them to do. I might try test that out someday. I kind had a thought like that before. There I go again starting a new story without finished what I'm doing right now :)

5.) What is a typical day like in your world?

A.) Lately long nights with a few hours sleep followed by efforts to promote the material I have already published. I am also trying to sort out a new job for myself. Wish me luck :) Or better yet help me make writing my job ;)

Author Links